Tuesday, August 1, 2006

Ständchen

You wouldn't believe how many Google searches on "English translation of Ständchen" lead to this blog. So I'm going to to the Google-searchers of the world a favor and include it here. I hope I'm not breaking any copyright rules. If I am, someone let me know, and I'll take it down.

"Ständchen" is the name of the Liszt piece I'm working on. Before Liszt got his magical hands on it, "Ständchen" was a song by Franz Schubert. And before Schubert got his hands on it, "Ständchen" was a poem by a German poet named Ludwig Rellstab.

I found the translation here, along with English translations for several other Schubert songs, or lieder. The site says this after the "Ständchen" translation: "text: Ludwig Rellstab, music: Franz Schubert (1797-1828). translation: a.l" Here it is ...

"Ständchen" ("Serenade")

My songs quietly implore you
through the night;
down to the silent wood
my love, come to me!

The tree tops whisper
in the light of the moon;
Don't be afraid, my love,
no-one will observe us.

Can you hear the nightingales?
Oh! They implore you,
their sweet lament
pleads with you on my behalf.

They understand the yearning I feel,
they know love's torture,
with their silvery notes
they touch every soft heart

Let them touch yours, too,
sweet love: hear my plea!
Trembling I await you,
come, bring me bliss!

19 comments:

  1. thank you I think it be no copyright law infringement of any kind think you just doing well

    thnnk you

    ReplyDelete
  2. youtube

    in the box click and enter

    terry wey and vienna boys choir

    enter again then click on file that says exactly terry wey vienna boys choir with leading boy in the picture click on it and for a full screen click bottom tight button of little player screeen window bottom right button will full screen your listening pleasure of

    standchen

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  3. Thanks for your effort but I'm very much afraid these lyrics dont correspond to what Terry Wey is singing in that beautiful YouTube video. My German is poor but anyone can see it's not the same words. I, too, am looking for the lyrics & English translation of Standchen.
    Regards from a fellow Schubert lover.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous: I was referring to Standchen from Schwanengesang, D. 957. Same title, different song.

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  5. ok thanks for the answer

    Here's the words for Standchen by
    Schubert

    D 920
    Ständchen
    melody by Schubert /Text by Grillparzer

    Zögernd leise
    In des Dunkels nächt'ger Hülle
    Sind wir hier;
    Und den Finger sanft gekrümmt,
    Leise, leise,
    Pochen wir
    An des Liebchens Kammertür.

    Doch nun steigend,
    Schwellend, schwellend,
    Mit vereinter Stimme, Laut
    Rufen aus wir hochvertraut;
    Schlaf du nicht,
    Wenn der Neigung Stimme spricht!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you sooo much for putting lyrics for Staendchen by Schubert on this blog. I am a huge fan of Schubert, and am taking this song to a State contest next month. I needed the translation so that I could know where to put emphasis in the German text "Leise flehen, meine Lieder, durch die Nacht zu dir." You are a miracle because I couldn't find anyplace with a translation and I don't have time to translate it myself, even with a little help. Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
  7. oh yer so welcome when you go to you tube and search for terry whey and vienna boys you'll come to a short version of the song sung very well its poetry but the music is lovely and to listen to its german dialec sung so elizuently and with many voices so lovely click what you need to click on when you search for terry wey and the vienna boys it should be the first one? and enjoy some german easy listening?

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  8. Back before 1992, I performed this song with an English translation. I can't seem to find it anywhere now but it was a far better translation than any I've come across via googling. It's recognizably different because it translates, "Liebchen, komm zu mir!" as "Come, my love, to me." Not necessarily the most accurate translation but perhaps the one that best captures the spirit of the German.

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  9. For the singers who are looking at translations: be very careful that you get the right 'Staendchen' to translate because the title is a general one - 'Serenade'- so there are a great number of them to choose from (such as the poems taken from the writers already mentioned, Grillparzer and Rellstab).

    A serenade was originally a song to woo a lover, sung in the evening and probably underneath the window. There isn't a general form to the style but there is at the beginning often a sense of secrecy and intimacy, a gentle 1 to 1 song.

    Naxos says, however, that in German, "A serenade (= German: Serenade, Ständchen) is often similar in form to the divertimento. Etymologically a piece for evening performance, usually outdoors, the counterpart of the morning Aubade, the title came to have a much more general meaning, although it often suggests a piece of music in honour of someone or something, an extension of the traditional performance of a lover beneath the window of his mistress."

    So, for example, the Grillparzer 'Zoegernd Leise...' above was first set to music in honour of a young girl's birthday, and is a bit more mischievous than the longing stanzas of 'Leise flehen meine Lieder...', which was an old-school one for a lover.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you so much! :)
    I'm singing the Schubert piece in a competition soon, this was extremely helpful!

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  11. There's a full version of Schuberts Standchen by Janet Baker on U tube, this has the German text displayed as the song is sung.
    Also there is a longer version of Terry Wey singing Stanchen with 2 verses on U tube.

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  12. i hope im not insulting anyone by mentioning this, but i am not sure i completely agree with that translation. it is along those lines, but my music says the german and english, and it is different to that...

    ReplyDelete
  13. There seems to be a lot of confusion over these two pieces...

    Hope this helps.

    Ständchen 'Zögernd, leise',
    for alto, chorus & piano
    'Notturno', D 920 Op posth 135
    Franz Schubert

    Lyrics...
    Text Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872)

    Zögernd, leise,
    in der Dunkelsnächtger Hülle
    sind wir hier.
    Und den Finger sanft gekrümmt, leise
    leise pochen wir an des Liebchens Kammertür.

    Doch nun steigend, schwellend, bebend,
    mit vereinter Stimme, Laut,
    rufen aus wir hochvertraut:
    schlaf du nicht, wenn der Neigung Stimme spricht.

    Sucht ein Weiser nah und ferne
    Menschen einst mit der Laterne,
    wie viel seltner dann als Gold
    Menschen uns geneigt und hold,

    drum wenn Freundschaft spricht, Liebe spricht,
    Freundin, Liebchen,
    schlaf du nicht.

    Aber was in allen Reichen
    wär dem Schlummer zu vergleichen?
    Drum statt Worten und statt Gaben
    sollst du nun auch Ruhe haben,

    noch ein Grüßchen, noch ein Wort,
    es verstummt die frohe Weise,
    leise, leise schleichen wir,
    ja, schleichen wir uns wieder fort.

    English...

    Reluctantly, quietly,
    Dunkelsnächtger in the shell
    we are here.
    And the finger is curved gently, softly
    quietly, we knock at the beloved chamber door.

    And now growing, swelling, trembling,
    with one voice, sound,
    highly familiar call from us:
    Do not sleep when love speaks the voice.

    Is looking for a wise man near and far
    People once with the lantern,
    how much more rare than gold
    People we like and hold,

    drum speaks when friendship, love, talks
    Friend, my love,
    do not sleep.

    But what of all the rich
    would compare the slumber?
    So instead of words and gifts
    You shall now have peace,

    still a greeting, a word,
    It silenced the good way;
    softly, softly we sneak
    yes, we slink away again.


    STÄNDCHEN (Serenade)

    Music by Franz Schubert (1797-1831); Lyrics by Ludwig Rellstab (1799-1860)


    Leise flehen meine Lieder durch die Nacht zu dir,
    In den stillen Hain hernieder, Liebchen, komm zu mir!
    Flüstend schlanke Wipfel rauschen in des Mondes Licht,
    des Verräters feindlich Lauschen fürchte, Holde, nicht.

    Hörst die Nachtigallen schlagen? Ach! Sie flehen dich,
    Mitder Töne süssen Klagen flehen sie für mich.
    Sie verstehn des Bussens Schnen, kennen Liebes schmerz,

    Rühren mit den Silbertönen jades weiche Herz.
    Lass auch dir die Brust bewegen, Liebchen, höre mich,
    Bebend harr’ ich dir entgegen!
    Komm, beglücke mich!

    English...

    Quiet my songs through the night to plead with you,
    In the quiet grove, my love, come to me!
    Flüstend rustling tree tops in the moonlight,
    the traitor spying afraid darling, do not.

    Do you hear the nightingales? Oh! They beckon to you,
    Mitder sweet, they beckon to me.
    They understand the bus Schnen know, love, pain,

    With their silver tones jades tender heart.
    Let's also move you like the breast, darling, hear me
    Trembling I await you!
    Come, tell me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A singable offering!
      Ständchen (Serenade)

      Through the night, my soul’s entreaty softly journeys to thee
      To the silent woodland reaching, “Dear one, hasten to me”.
      Slender, murm’ring treetops whisper to the moon above, to the moon above,
      From the face of treach’rous whispers, turn thee away, my love, turn thee away, my love.

      Hear thee now the nightingale calling, here, beseeching of thee,
      Sweet is his note, the night-time falling, he implores thee for me.
      He is of the gentle sweetness, knows of the pain of love, knows of the pain of love.
      How he moves each heart so tender, singing for me above, singing for me above.

      Let this touch thy heart, my dear one, this my lover’s plea,
      Trembling here you’ll find me waiting, till you might come to me, till you might come to me
      Might come to me.

      Delete
    2. Ständchen (Serenade)

      Through the night, my soul’s entreaty softly journeys to thee
      To the silent woodland reaching, “Dear one, hasten to me”.
      Slender, murm’ring treetops whisper to the moon above, to the moon above,
      From the face of treach’rous whispers, turn thee away, my love, turn thee away, my love.

      Hear thee now the nightingale calling, here, beseeching of thee,
      Sweet is his note, the night-time falling, he implores thee for me.
      He is of the gentle sweetness, knows of the pain of love, knows of the pain of love.
      How he moves each heart so tender, singing for me above, singing for me above.

      Let this touch thy heart, my dear one, this my lover’s plea,
      Trembling here you’ll find me waiting, till you might come to me, till you might come to me
      Might come to me.

      Delete
  14. It is hard to translate a song and put it in a form that can be used. I have spent some time on a singable translation and, although there are some liberties taken, offer this:

    Ständchen (Serenade)

    Through the night, my soul’s entreaty softly journeys to thee
    To the silent woodland reaching, “Dear one, hasten to me”.
    Slender, murm’ring treetops whisper to the moon above, to the moon above,
    From the face of treach’rous whispers, turn thee away, my love, turn thee away, my love.

    Hear thee now the nightingale calling, here, beseeching of thee,
    Sweet is his note, the night-time falling, he implores thee for me.
    He is of the gentle sweetness, knows of the pain of love, knows of the pain of love.
    How he moves each heart so tender, singing for me above, singing for me above.

    Let this touch thy heart, my dear one, this my lover’s plea,
    Trembling here you’ll find me waiting, till you might come to me, till you might come to me
    Might come to me.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ständchen (Serenade)

    Through the night, my soul’s entreaty softly journeys to thee
    To the silent woodland reaching, “Dear one, hasten to me”.
    Slender, murm’ring treetops whisper to the moon above, to the moon above,
    From the face of treach’rous whispers, turn thee away, my love, turn thee away, my love.

    Hear thee now the nightingale calling, here, beseeching of thee,
    Sweet is his note, the night-time falling, he implores thee for me.
    He is of the gentle sweetness, knows of the pain of love, knows of the pain of love.
    How he moves each heart so tender, singing for me above, singing for me above.

    Let this touch thy heart, my dear one, this my lover’s plea,
    Trembling here you’ll find me waiting, till you might come to me, till you might come to me
    Might come to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry - sent it four times - not because I was proud of it. Just didn't understand the procedure

      Delete